Ir para o conteúdo
ou

Software livre Brasil

Minha rede

 Voltar a planetas
Tela cheia Sugerir um artigo
 Feed RSS

Planeta do Gnome Brasil

11 de Fevereiro de 2010, 0:00 , por Software Livre Brasil - | Ninguém está seguindo este artigo ainda.

Felipe Borges: Contributing to Boxes

12 de Junho de 2018, 13:17, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

I have to admit that Boxes is a bit late for the Flatpak party, but that’s not a problem. The technical difficulties of getting a virtualization hypervisor to run inside the flatpak sandbox are mostly overcomed. This way, contributing to Boxes has never been easier.

In the following sections I will describe the step-by-step process of making your first code contribution to GNOME Boxes.

Get GNOME Builder

Builder makes it very easy to download and build GNOME applications with just a couple of clicks. It will also make your life easier while writing the code.

Download Builder

Download and build Boxes

GNOME Builder: cloning a project and building it

That’s it! Now that you have the project built and can run it, we can start looking into fixing bugs.

Finding an issue to hack

You can have an overview of the ongoing work in the project by browsing our kanban board. We also have issues tagged as Newcomers if you are making your first contribution and want to start hacking on something easy.

Create a GitLab account and fork the project

Visit gitlab.gnome.org and create an account. GitLab will pop up a banner asking you to add your SSH keys to your profile, or you can go directly to edit your profile.

After your profile has been properly setup, it is time to fork the project!

Go to the Boxes project page and click the Fork button. This will create your own copy of the git repository under your personal namespace in GitLab.

Finally, get your fork URL and add to your local git repository as a remote:

git remote add fork $project_url

Making changes and submitting your code

After building Boxes and finding an issue to work, it is time to dive into the codebase. Edit the files and press the GNOME Builder “play” button to see your changes take effect.

Since the migration to GitLab, we have adopted the merge request workflow.

You need to:

1. Create a git branch and commit your changes

git checkout -b $descriptive-branch-name

Do your work, and commit your changes. Take a look at our commit message guidelines.

2. Push your changes for the world to see!

git push fork

A message with a link to create a merge request will be printed in your terminal. Click it, describe your changes, and Submit!

3. Follow up on the feedback

Me and other developers will review your work and recommend changes if necessary. We will iterate over and over until your contributions are ready to be merged.

4. Celebrate your first contribution!

Further reading

The steps described above are based on the GNOME Newcomers initiative. We have a detailed step-by-step process of making contributions and you should definitely check it out. It has pointers about documentation, tips about finding the right approach to dive into the code base, and examples.

Let’s do it!



Felipe Borges: Boxes + Flatpak

25 de Maio de 2018, 10:49, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

TL;DR: You can now install GNOME Boxes directly from Flathub! 🎉

INSTALL

Why are we so excited about this?

It might seem at first sight that Boxes is a simple application, and that is partially true if you ignore the deep stack under the hood responsible for making virtualization simple™. The various modules (some of them gigantic such as qemu, libvirt, freerdp…) need to be setup in perfect harmony for us to boot a whole operating system with its essential functionalities.

The GNU/Linux distribution model has historically delegated to downstream packagers the responsibility of integrating dependencies in order to provide an application to their end users. This model has worked for some for many decades, but it has fundamental flaws that “trickle down” making the upstream developers’ life miserable.

Don’t get me wrong, bugs are mostly our fault, but a significant amount of bug reports I receive consist of issues I cannot reproduce in my development environment. A combinatorial explosion of package versions, build flags, and/or pivotal architecture differences between distros.

Therefore this is the first and foremost benefit we get from shipping Boxes as a Flatpak.

Another difficulty we face during our development cycle is having the ability of having designers, translators, and marketing folk being able to run our latest snapshot or a specific work-in-progress tree. With the GitLab continuous integration combined with Flatpak we can spin bundles at any moment, and they can be installed within a couple of clicks, alongside other versions of the same app! This is The Future!

Having our apps widely available is another concern we have. Many distributions which stick to the package model also support Flatpak. Besides that, there are new players which are essentially different. Container-based desktop operating systems are a thing now too.

Software is never done…

There are indeed downsides of running Boxes in a Flatpak in comparison with a well crafted build of dependencies bottom-up. But these are issues that can be solved and are going to be prioritized in our TODO list.

Running Boxes in a Flatpak TODAY you won’t have yet:

  • A bridged network between host and guests.
  • The ability of installing an image from a physical device.
  • Access to your system’s libvirtd (we run our own libvirtd in the sandbox).
  • Shared folders.
  • USB redirection.
  • $YOUR_ISSUE_HERE

The list above is far from complete, and I would like to count on you to experiment with the Flatpak and report issues you might encounter. Use the label “flatpak” to collect points which you can later exchange for beers or other beverages of your choice. 😉



Felipe Borges: Boxes now supports RDP connections

18 de Maio de 2018, 13:41, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

Boxes has been the go-to option for easy virtual machine setups in GNOME for quite some time, but some people don’t know that our beloved application can also act as a remote viewer.

The “Enter URL” option in the new machine assistant is how you get a new remote machine added to your collection. It supports addresses of Spice and VNC servers and oVirt and Libvirt brokers. You can also paste the URL of an operating system image (iso, img, qcow, etc…) and Boxes will download and boot it for you.

However, there is life out of our GNU/Linux boxes and we need to stay connected. Windows is extremely popular and it ships a RDP server by default, making the adoption of open alternatives a bit unhandy there.

Imagine you have clients running Windows that need your remote support, or you couldn’t convince your family back home to switch to GNU/Linux, etc…

Now Boxes also supports RDP!

Boxes - screenshot

This feature is powered by FreeRDP. For convenience, I wrote a glib wrapper around the essential freerdp API so we can consume it via gobject-introspection in GNOME Boxes and others could reuse it for their own applications.

Heavily inspired in the gtk-vnc API,  I decided to name it gtk-frdp. So original! 😉

If you are interested in writing a RDP client of your own, or maybe port an existent one to gtk-frdp, you can achieve it with a few lines of code such as below (I choose Python for legibility, but it could be any gobject-introspected language of your choice).

from gi.repository import Gtk, GtkFrdp

window = Gtk.Window () display = GtkFrdp.Display () window.add (display)
display.open_host ("192.168.0.1", 3389) display.username = "username" display.password = "password"
window.show_all () Gtk.main ()

That simple!

This and a few other cool features will be available in our next stable release, GNOME 3.30. Stay tuned!



Felipe Borges: Boxes happenings in the 3.28 cycle

5 de Abril de 2018, 12:45, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

It is been a long time coming, but I finally decided to take a moment to summarize the Boxes happenings in the last six months. And a lot has happened!

git diff –shortstat gnome-3-26 gnome-3-28
162 files changed, 10913 insertions(+), 7951 deletions(-)

Firstly, I haven’t stated in this blog that I am maintaining Boxes for the last couple of releases. It’s been an exciting learning journey and I cannot thank Zeeshan Ali enough for paving the way for me.

3.28 has many internal changes and enhancements worth enumerating, therefore I am going to highlight the most relevant ones IMO.

No-Cost RHEL Developer Subscription

You can now subscribe for a non-cost Red Hat Enterprise Linux developer subscription and benefit from all the goods included in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux Developer Suite.

You read it first in Debarshi’s blog post!

Download an OS

Distro hoping was my hobby back in the days when distros were really different from each other. I feel that this is somehow coming back now with new players targeting the desktop market, such as Endless OS and Pop!_OS.

Boxes intents to make it easy for people to try new operating systems from the comfort of their current system. Whether you want to explore, run something in a contained environment, perform something risky and easily recover your installation, Boxes wants to make it simple.

I previously wrote a blog post specifically on this feature. Lots has changed since then and more changes are coming. Stay tuned!

Port to GtkFlowBox

Libgd was an experimental ground for us to introduce many widgets, including our re-sizable icon views with their selection-mode and convenient API. Boxes no longer needs libgd for that since Gtk+ has been evolving along the years and more modern widgets have been gradually introduced.

We ported the notifications from GdNotifications to GtkRevealer, and now the content views are GtkFlowBox and GtkListBox.

Visually it should look no different to the end-user, but for developers it means a significant code simplification.

$ git diff 749638d..eda5ee3 –shortstat src/icon-view.vala
1 file changed, 143 insertions(+), 336 deletions(-)

Migrating to GitLab

The migration to GitLab is another bit that shouldn’t make a difference from an end-user point of view, but is indeed a big deal for everyone involved in development.

Our Kanban board is now the homepage in my working machine.

New contributors are finally comfortable with the contribution workflow, and my bet is that soon we will have statistics to back that up.

File transfers

As simple as that!

A courtesy of Visarion Alexandru.

Port to meson

The word is that nobody ever wrote autotools files from the scratch, ever, but copied from an existing working project and tweaked it. I am no different. My understanding of autotools has been always superficial despite trying to learn it a few times.

No disrespect for those who came before. I acknowledge the needs of ancient times and I wouldn’t bash more something that’s so far from my domain.

The learning curve for Meson made me finally have the motivation to understand build systems. The cleanness of syntax and file structure is definitely medicine for my organizational obsession.

Special thanks to Iñigo Martínez for his dedication to help porting many of our components to Meson.

Handle mime-types

Yep yep, double click on an image/iso file and install!

That’s All Folks!

Many bugfixes landed in this cycle, so I encourage you to check it out.

GNOME Boxes 3.28 is the resulting work of 57 contributors!

If you are interested in contributing to GNOME Boxes, join us on irc.gnome.org, channel #boxes. We have #newcomers issues in our bug tracking so you can start from the beginning.



Gustavo Noronha (kov): CEF on Wayland

22 de Dezembro de 2017, 11:25, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

TL;DR: we have patches for CEF to enable its usage on Wayland and X11 through the Mus/Ozone infrastructure that is to become Chromium’s streamlined future. And also for Content Shell!

At Collabora we have recently done some work for a customer who wanted to upgrade their system from X11 to Wayland. The problem: they use CEF as a runtime for web applications and CEF was not Wayland-ready. They also wanted to have something which was as future-proof and as upstreamable as possible, so the Chromium team’s plans were quite relevant.

Chromium is at the same time very modular and quite monolithic. It supports several platforms and has slightly different code paths in each, while at the same time acting as a desktop shell for Chromium OS. To make it even more complex, the Chromium team is constantly rewriting bits or doing major refactorings.

That means you’ll often find several different and incompatible ways of doing something in the code base. You will usually not find clear and stable interfaces, which is where tools like CEF come in, to provide some stability to users of the framework. CEF neutralizes some of the instability, providing a more stable API.

So we started by looking at 1) where is Chromium headed and 2) what kind of integration CEF needed with Chromium’s guts to work with Wayland? We quickly found that the Chromium team is trying to streamline some of the infrastructure so that it can be better shared among the several use cases, reducing duplication and complexity.

That’s where the mus+ash (pronounced “mustache”) project comes in. It wants to make a better split of the window management and shell functionalities of Chrome OS from the browser while at the same time replacing obsolete IPC systems with Mojo. That should allow a lot more code sharing with the “Linux Desktop” version. It also meant that we needed to get CEF to talk Mus.

Chromium already has Wayland support that was built by Intel a while ago for the Ozone display platform abstraction layer. More recently, the ozone-wayland-dev branch was started by our friends at Igalia to integrate that work with mus+ash, implementing the necessary Mus and Mojo interfaces, window decorations, menus and so on. That looked like the right base to use for our CEF changes.

It took quite a bit of effort and several Collaborans participated in the effort, but we eventually managed to convince CEF to properly start the necessary processes and set them up for running with Mus and Ozone. Then we moved on to make the use cases our customer cared about stable and to port their internal runtime code.

We contributed touch support for the Wayland Ozone backend, which we are in the process of upstreaming, reported a few bugs on the Mus/Ozone integration, and did some debugging for others, which we still need to figure out better fixes for.

For instance, the way Wayland fd polling works does not integrate nicely with the Chromium run loop, since there needs to be some locking involved. If you don’t lock/unlock the display for polling, you may end up in a situation in which you’re told there is something to read and before you actually do the read the GL stack may do it in another thread, causing your blocking read to hang forever (or until there is something to read, like a mouse move). As a work-around, we avoided the Chromium run loop entirely for Wayland polling.

More recently, we have start working on an internal project for adding Mus/Ozone support to Content Shell, which is a test shell simpler than Chromium the browser. We think it will be useful as a test bed for future work that uses Mus/Ozone and the content API but not the browser UI, since it lives inside the Chromium code base. We are looking forward to upstreaming it soon!

PS: if you want to build it and try it out, here are some instructions:

# Check out Google build tools and put them on the path
$ git clone https://chromium.googlesource.com/a/chromium/tools/depot_tools.git
$ export PATH=$PATH:`pwd`/depot_tools

# Check out chromium; note the 'src' after the git command, it is important
$ mkdir chromium; cd chromium
$ git clone -b cef-wayland https://gitlab.collabora.com/web/chromium.git src
$ gclient sync  --jobs 16 --with_branch_heads

# To use CEF, download it and look at or use the script we put in the repository
$ cd src # cef goes inside the chromium source tree
$ git clone -b cef-wayland https://gitlab.collabora.com/web/cef.git
$ sh ./cef/build.sh # NOTE: you may need to edit this script to adapt to your directory structure
$ out/Release_GN_x64/cefsimple --mus --use-views

# To build Content Shell you do not need to download CEF, just switch to the branch and build
$ cd src
$ git checkout -b content_shell_mus_support origin/content_shell_mus_support
$ gn args out/Default --args="use_ozone=true enable_mus=true use_xkbcommon=true"
$ ninja -C out/Default content_shell
$ ./out/Default/content_shell --mus --ozone-platform=wayland


Felipe Borges: Download and install operating systems directly in GNOME Boxes

4 de Dezembro de 2017, 10:35, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

If you are closely following the development of GNOME Boxes, you probably have read Debarshi’s announcement of this new feature that allows you to download and install Red Hat Enterprise Linux gratis directly from Boxes.

This time we are enabling you to install many other operating system virtual machines right from inside Boxes. A moving picture is better than words, so watch the preview below:

View on YouTube

The list is populated by libosinfo, which gets updated shortly after every new OS release. If you don’t see your favorite distro there, please send us a patch.

This feature will feature GNOME 3.28.
Happy virtualization!



Gustavo Noronha (kov): Who knew we still had low-hanging fruits?

16 de Outubro de 2017, 18:23, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

Earlier this month I had the pleasure of attending the Web Engines Hackfest, hosted by Igalia at their offices in A Coruña, and also sponsored by my employer, Collabora, Google and Mozilla. It has grown a lot and we had many new people this year.

Fun fact: I am one of the 3 or 4 people who have attended all of the editions of the hackfest since its inception in 2009, when it was called WebKitGTK+ hackfest \o/

20171002_204405

It was a great get together where I met many friends and made some new ones. Had plenty of discussions, mainly with Antonio Gomes and Google’s Robert Kroeger, about the way forward for Chromium on Wayland.

We had the opportunity of explaining how we at Collabora cooperated with igalians to implemented and optimise a Wayland nested compositor for WebKit2 to share buffers between processes in an efficient way even on broken drivers. Most of the discussions and some of the work that led to this was done in previous hackfests, by the way!

20171002_193518

The idea seems to have been mostly welcomed, the only concern being that Wayland’s interfaces would need to be tested for security (fuzzed). So we may end up going that same route with Chromium for allowing process separation between the UI and GPU (being renamed Viz, currently) processes.

On another note, and going back to the title of the post, at Collabora we have recently adopted Mattermost to replace our internal IRC server. Many Collaborans have decided to use Mattermost through an Epiphany Web Application or through a simple Python application that just shows a GTK+ window wrapping a WebKitGTK+ WebView.

20171002_101952

Some people noticed that when the connection was lost Mattermose would take a very long time to notice and reconnect – its web sockets were taking a long, long time to timeout, according to our colleague Andrew Shadura.

I did some quick searching on the codebase and noticed WebCore has a NetworkStateNotifier interface that it uses to get notified when connection changes. That was not implemented for WebKitGTK+, so it was likely what caused stuff to linger when a connection hiccup happened. Given we have GNetworkMonitor, implementation of the missing interfaces required only 3 lines of actual code (plus the necessary boilerplate)!

screenshot-from-2017-10-16-11-13-39

I was surprised to still find such as low hanging fruit in WebKitGTK+, so I decided to look for more. Turns out WebCore also has a notifier for low power situations, which was implemented only by the iOS port, and causes the engine to throttle some timers and avoid some expensive checks it would do in normal situations. This required a few more lines to implement using upower-glib, but not that many either!

That was the fun I had during the hackfest in terms of coding. Mostly I had fun just lurking in break out sessions discussing the past, present and future of tech such as WebRTC, Servo, Rust, WebKit, Chromium, WebVR, and more. I also beat a few challengers in Street Fighter 2, as usual.

I’d like to say thanks to Collabora, Igalia, Google, and Mozilla for sponsoring and attending the hackfest. Thanks to Igalia for hosting and to Collabora for sponsoring my attendance along with two other collaborans. It was a great hackfest and I’m looking forward to the next one! See you in 2018 =)



Vicente Aguiar: Da contracultura à cibercultura: Uma reflexão sobre o papel dos hackers.

10 de Julho de 2017, 18:35, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

Da contracultura   cibercultura  uma reflex o sobre o papel dos hackers.

Com o início do século XXI, estamos vivendo um desses raros intervalos na história. Um período em que a base tecnológica das nossas relações em sociedade está — e tudo indica que continuará por um bom tempo — imersa num intenso processo de transformações tecnológicas e culturais. Assim, de forma semelhante ao que aconteceu no século XIX, com a revolução industrial e o surgimento da produção em série mediada por máquinas, as novas tecnologias de informação e comunicação, em especial a internet, revolucionam os meios de comunicação humana, como também alicerçam transformações nas mais diversas áreas da vida em sociedade.

Tendo a liberdade de acesso, produção e compartilhamento de informações como um dos grandes princípios estruturantes, as mudanças propiciadas pelos liames digitais da internet representam até o surgimento de um novo paradigma tecnológico, de uma nova Era Pós-Industrial.

Contudo, cientistas sociais, como Manuel Castells e Fred Turner, nos lembram que não existem revoluções de natureza tecnológica que não sejam precedidas de transformações culturais. Como tecnologias revolucionárias têm que ser pensadas, elas não são o resultado de um simples processo técnico ou incremental, mas sim fruto de pensamentos libertários e subversivos que são, por exemplo, ligados a gestos de rebeldia e desobediência civil. Dentro desse entendimento, esses mesmos autores afirmam que existe uma relação estreita entre os movimentos de contracultura dos anos 60 e a cibercultura libertária dos nossos dias.

Para além dos festivais de música e das manifestações do movimento hippie, os princípios de liberdade de expressão que marcaram essa época também se fizeram presente ao longo de todo o processo de criação e difusão da internet pelo que hoje é denominado de “cultura hacker”. Todavia, antes de seguirmos adiante nessa história, faz-se necessário esclarecer certa ambiguidade ou mal-entendido sobre o termo e a práxis social dos hackers. Afinal, na sua origem, o termo hacker não está associado a indivíduos irresponsáveis que invadem sistemas computacionais de forma ilícita — como é normalmente propagado pela mídia de massa mais tradicional. Esses sujeitos que violam sistemas de segurança e quebram códigos computacionais são, especificamente, denominados de “crackers” e, em geral, são também repudiados pelas comunidades de hackers. É claro que todo “cracker” já foi um hacker e isso possibilita que formadores de opinião — como, por exemplo, o jornalista e produtor cultural Nelson Motta — afirmem que todo hacker seja sim um cracker.

No entanto, de forma contrária a uma visão mais restrita que tenha como base o exemplo de alguns poucos crackers que ganharam fama no mundo por conta de invasões espetaculares em poderosos computadores corporativos, esse artigo tenta ir um pouco além desse entendimento. Em especial, buscamos resgatar a visão do filósofo finlandês Pekka Himanen e os artigos de um dos integrantes da própria comunidade hacker, Eric Raymond, que reforçam a importância desses primeiros “nativos digitais” como uma importante expressão cultural contemporânea de caráter libertário e inovador. Isto porque os hackers estão vinculados a um conjunto de valores e crenças que emergiram, num primeiro momento, das redes de pessoas que desenvolviam softwares e interagiam em redes computacionais em torno da colaboração em projetos de programação criativa. Isso significa, então, partir de um entendimento que essa cultura hacker desempenhou um papel central ao longo da história de desenvolvimento dos principais símbolos tecnológicos da atual sociedade em rede, como os primeiros computadores pessoais (PCs), a internet e os primeiros sistemas operacionais, como o UNIX. E essa cultura criativa perdura até o presente momento de forma pulsante. Afinal, inúmeras pesquisas demonstram como os hackers sustentam o ambiente fomentador de inovações tecnológicas significativas, mediante a colaboração e comunicação on-line, como também acaba permitindo a conexão entre o conhecimento originado em universidades e centros de pesquisas com os produtos empresariais que difundem as tecnologias da informação no “mundo dos átomos” — isto é, na materialidade da economia contemporânea.

Tendo a liberdade técnica de acesso, uso, compartilhamento, modificação e criação como valor supremo, a cultura hacker se manifesta em diversas áreas por meio de uma nova ética de trabalho, que lança alguns “enigmas contemporâneos” sobre o comportamento e as próprias relações sociotécnicas na realidade contemporânea. Mais especificamente, esse suposto comportamento enigmático, em termos de engajamento digital, emerge a partir de questões como: quais os valores que levam hoje milhares de tecnólogos a desenvolverem um software de alta complexidade como o Linux, na maioria dos casos de forma voluntária, além de o distribuírem de forma livre pela internet? Ou ainda, o que exatamente impulsiona milhares de wikipedistas de diversas partes do mundo a se juntarem na internet de forma colaborativa para criar e compartilhar conhecimento de forma livre e gratuita, por meio de um projeto enciclopédico internacional?

Umas das respostas mais encontradas em pesquisas sobre essa temática é que os hackers trabalham e se engajam em projetos dessa natureza, antes de tudo, porque os desafios técnicos e intelectuais são interessantes. Problemas encontrados no processo de criação de um determinado bem causam uma forte curiosidade e atração para essas pessoas, tornando-as sempre ávidas por mais conhecimento para criar ou encontrar uma solução inovadora. Essa atividade de produção exerceria então um poder de fascínio sobre esses sujeitos envolvidos pela cultura hacker, a ponto de o próprio trabalho, em determinadas condições, servir como um momento de se “recarregar as energias” — por mais contraditório que isso possa parecer num primeiro momento. Assim, para definir o princípio que rege as atividades de um indivíduo que se afirma como um hacker, o Linus Torvalds (hacker criador do Linux) acredita que as palavras “paixão” e “diversão” podem descrever bem a força lúdica que move ele a dedicar horas de um trabalho que muitas vezes é empreendido no “tempo livre”.

Por conta disso, não é difícil perceber que esta relação passional com o trabalho não é privilégio dos hackers de computador. Muito ao contrário. Em seu guia Como Tornar-se um Hacker, Eric Raymond também afirma que é possível encontrar outros tipos de hackers entre diversas áreas. “Há pessoas que aplicam a atitude hacker em outras coisas, como eletrônica ou música — na verdade, você pode encontrá-la nos níveis mais altos de qualquer ciência ou arte. Hackers de software reconhecem esses espíritos aparentados de outros lugares e podem chamá-los de ‘hackers’ também — e alguns alegam que a natureza hacker é realmente independente da mídia particular em que o hacker trabalha”.

Por exemplo, há vários pontos de contato entre tecelões, artesãos e a cultura hacker. Isto porque é possível perceber que todos eles (tecelões, artesãos e hackers) comungam de muitos valores inerentes ao trabalho criativo e coletivo, como, por exemplo, o compartilhamento do conhecimento que fundamenta o processo da produção de um bem ou uma obra — além, é claro, do prazer e da alegria inerente ao ato da criação em si. Afinal, o que seria, por exemplo, da gastronomia mundial sem o antigo hábito popular de se compartilhar receitas de culinária para se adaptar e criar novos e saborosos pratos pelos chefes de cozinha.

Richard Stallman, fundador da Free Software Foundation, ressalta, então, que um hacker é antes de tudo alguém que ama o que faz e, por conta disso, busca sempre inovar e explorar novas possibilidades no exercício do seu ofício em colaboração com seus pares. Isso significa dizer que um hacker, como individuo, busca sempre não apenas usar, mas principalmente aprimorar e aperfeiçoar o objeto de sua paixão, no contexto de um setor, organização ou comunidade da qual interage e participa. Para isso, o acesso irrestrito e o compartilhamento do conhecimento associado ao uso e ao processo de produção de um bem em questão é para um hacker, da mesma forma que para seus pares, uma condição vital da sua práxis social.

Dentro dessa perspectiva, esse ímpeto lúdico e colaborativo permite aos hackers romperem com uma dimensão clássica dos sistemas criativos da modernidade industrial: a separação entre quem usa e quem cria, aperfeiçoa ou produz um determinado bem. Em outras palavras, isso significa que a cultura hacker supera a clássica dicotomia entre “criadores” e “usuários”, pois partem de uma (antiga) premissa produtiva: os usuários são a base de toda a organização criativa somente por uma simples razão: todos os criadores eram usuários antes de começarem a contribuir com suas criações.

* Texto originalmente publicado na Revista Objectiva.



Jonh Wendell: Fedora 26 não conecta no wireless

20 de Abril de 2017, 19:17, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

Esta é uma dica rápida caso você, assim como eu, tenha o mesmo problema ao instalar o Fedora 26 (alfa).

O instalador não conseguiu conectar no meu roteador wireless, um D-Link. Mais especificamente, ele não estava recebendo um endereço IP do roteador. Ao que parece, um problema relacionado a DHCP.

Se for este o caso, abra um terminal (pressione a tecla Windows, digite “Terminal” e aperte Enter), e digite o seguinte comando:

sudo sh -c 'echo "send dhcp-client-identifier = hardware;" > /etc/dhcp/dhclient.conf'

Agora reconecte na rede wireless. Depois do primeiro boot – com o sistema já instalado – repita o comando acima, uma única vez.

A propósito, esse bug não é recente. Aconteceu comigo no Fedora 25, mas somente no sistema instalado. Dentro do instalador tudo funcionou perfeitamente. Agora, no F26, tá acontecendo desde o começo. Aqui o link do bugzilla, para os curiosos: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1154200.

Espero ter ajudado. Bom Fedora pra vcs!



Vicente Aguiar: Rede Suiça de Educação Artística adere ao Noosfero

13 de Março de 2017, 3:23, por Planeta GNOME Brasil - 0sem comentários ainda

Anotherroadmap

A rede internacional Another Roadmap for Arts Education (Outro Roteiro para a Educação Artística), que reúne educadores/as e pesquisadores/as em museus, universidades, escolas e projetos culturais e educativos passou a utilizar o Noosfero como plataforma de articulação e comunicação entre seus núcleos ao redor do mundo. A rede agrega 22 grupos ao redor do mundo com a proposta de trabalhar a educação artística inserida nas relações sociais e políticas, respeitando os contextos locais.

Another Roadmap surgiu do anseio de educadores/as e pesquisadores/as de fazer uma análise crítica do Roteiro para a Educação Artística da Unesco, definido em 2006, e da Agenda de Seul (2010), uma série de metas mundiais para o desenvolvimento da Arte e Educação. A rede, que deu início à Another Roadmap School (Escola Outro Roteiro), tem a perspectiva de questionar a hegemonia dos conceitos ocidentais de arte e educação e elaborar alternativas e novos paradigmas para as pesquisas e práticas relacionadas à educação artística.

A plataforma utilizada pela rede foi desenvolvida pela Colivre por meio de um serviço prestado à Universidade de Artes de Zurique na Suiça. Por utilizar o Noosfero, a plataforma permite autonomia para os grupos que fazem parte da rede porque possibilita que cada perfil de comunidade e usuário na rede possa ter seu próprio layout customizado além de possuir funcionalidades de blogs, fóruns, agendam, wiki, pastas de arquivos, galeria de imagens, entre outras.

O Noosfero é uma plataforma web livre para a criação de redes sociais autônomas com foco no compartilhamento de conteúdo. Desenvolvido pela Colivre e lançado em 2009 durante o III Encontro Nordestino de Software Livre, o Noosfero já garantiu o primeiro lugar em diversos prêmios nacionais à cooperativa como o 9º Prêmio Cooperativa do Ano em 2014, o Prêmio Pontos de Mídia Livre do Ministério da Cultura em 2015 e o Prêmio Especial Recursos Educacionais Abertos da Revista ARede Educa em 2016.

Para conhecer mais sobre a rede Another Roadmap for Arts Education acesse o site oficial através do endereço http://another.zhdk.ch/.



Tags deste artigo: gnome planet planeta