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28 de Maio de 2009, 0:00 , por Desconhecido - | Ninguém está seguindo este artigo ainda.
In this blog I share technical information, write about projects I'm involved with, or about cool/fun/interesting stuff I find.

Papo Livre #1 - meios de comunicação

6 de Junho de 2017, 12:44, por Antonio Terceiro

Acabamos de lançar mais um episódio do Papo Livre: #1 – meios de comunicação.

Neste episódio eu, Paulo Santana e Thiago Mendonça discutimos os diversos meios de comunicação em comunidades de software livre. A discussão começa pelos meios mais “antigos”, como IRC e listas de discussão e chega aos mais “modernos”, passo pelo meio livre e meio proprietário Telegram, e chega à mais nova promessa nessa área, Matrix (e o seu cliente mais famoso/viável, Riot).



Debian CI: new data retention policy

28 de Maio de 2017, 21:17, por Antonio Terceiro

When I started debci for Debian CI, I went for the simplest thing that could possibly work. One of the design decisions was to use the filesystem directly for file storage. A large part of the Debian CI data is log files and test artifacts (which are just files), and using the filesystem directly for storage makes it a lot easier to handle it. The rest of the data which is structured (test history and status of packages) is stored as JSON files.

Another nice benefit of using the filesystem like this is that I get a sort of REST API for free by just exposing the file storage to the web. For example, getting the latest test status of debci itself on unstable/amd64 is as easy as:


$ curl https://ci.debian.net/data/packages/unstable/amd64/d/debci/latest.json
{
  "run_id": "20170528_173652",
  "package": "debci",
  "version": "1.5.1",
  "date": "2017-05-28 17:43:05",
  "status": "pass",
  "blame": [],
  "previous_status": "pass",
  "duration_seconds": "373",
  "duration_human": "0h 6m 13s",
  "message": "Tests passed, but at least one test skipped",
  "last_pass_version": "1.5.1",
  "last_pass_date": "2017-05-28 17:43:05"
}

Now, nothing in life is without compromises. One big disadvantage of the way debci stored its data is that there were a lot of files, which ends up using a large number of inodes in the filesystem. The current Debian CI master has more than 10 million inodes in its filesystem, and almost all of them were being used. This is clearly unsustainable.

You will notice that I said stored, because as of version 1.6, debci now implements a data retention policy: log files and test artifacts will now only be kept for a configurable amount of days (default: 180).

So there you have it: effective immediately, Debian CI will not provide logs and test artifacts older than 180 days.

If you are reporting bugs based on logs from Debian CI, please don’t hotlink the log files. Instead, make sure you download the logs in question and attach them to the bug report, because in 6 months they will be gone.



Papo Livre Podcast, episodio #0

23 de Maio de 2017, 12:28, por Antonio Terceiro

Podcasts têm sido um dos meus passatempos favoritos a um tempo. Eu acho que é um formato muito interssante, por dois motivos.

Primeiro, existem muitos podcasts com conteúdo de altíssima qualidade. Meu feed atualmente contém os seguintes (em ordem de assinatura):

Parece muito, e é. Ultimamente eu notei que estava ouvindo episódios com várias semanas de atraso, e resolvi priorizar episódios cujo tema me interessam muito e/ou que dizem respeito a temas da atualidade. Além disso desencanei de tentar escutar tudo, e passei a aceitar que vou deletar alguns itens sem escutar.

Segundo, ouvir um podcast não exige que você pare pra dar atenção total. Por exemplo, por conta de uma lesão no joelho que me levou a fazer cirurgia reconstrução de ligamento, eu estou condenado a fazer musculação para o resto da minha vida, o que é um saco. Depois que eu comecei a ouvir podcasts, eu tenho vontade de ir pra academia, porque agora isso representa o meu principal momento de ouvir podcast. Além disso, toda vez que eu preciso me deslocar sozinho pra qualquer lugar, ou fazer alguma tarefa chata mas necessária como lavar louça, eu tenho companhia.

Fazia um tempo que eu tinha vontade de fazer um podcast, e ontem oficialmente esse projeto se tornou realidade. Eu, Paulo Santana e Thiago Mendonça estamos lançando o Podcast Papo Livre onde discutiremos software livre em todos os seus aspectos.

No primeiro episódio, partindo da notícia sobre a vinda de Richard Stallman ao Brasil nas próximas semanas, discutimos as origens e alguns conceitos fundamentais do software livre.



Patterns for Testing Debian Packages

17 de Março de 2017, 1:07, por Antonio Terceiro

At the and of 2016 I had the pleasure to attend the 11th Latin American Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs, a.k.a SugarLoaf PLoP. PLoP is a series of conferences on Patterns (as in “Design Patterns”), a subject that I appreciate a lot. Each of the PLoP conferences but the original main “big” conference has a funny name. SugarLoaf PLoP is called that way because its very first edition was held in Rio de Janeiro, so the organizers named it after a very famous mountain in Rio. The name stuck even though a long time has passed since it was held in Rio for the last time. 2016 was actually the first time SugarLoaf PLoP was held outside of Brazil, finally justifying the “Latin American” part of its name.

I was presenting a paper I wrote on patterns for testing Debian packages. The Debian project funded my travel expenses through the generous donations of its supporters. PLoP’s are very fun conferences with a relaxed atmosphere, and is amazing how many smart (and interesting!) people gather together for them.

My paper is titled “Patterns for Writing As-Installed Tests for Debian Packages”, and has the following abstract:

Large software ecosystems, such as GNU/Linux distributions, demand a large amount of effort to make sure all of its components work correctly invidually, and also integrate correctly with each other to form a coherent system. Automated Quality Assurance techniques can prevent issues from reaching end users. This paper presents a pattern language originated in the Debian project for automated software testing in production-like environments. Such environments are closer in similarity to the environment where software will be actually deployed and used, as opposed to the development environment under which developers and regular Continuous Integration mechanisms usually test software products. The pattern language covers the handling of issues arising from the difference between development and production-like environments, as well as solutions for writing new, exclusive tests for as-installed functional tests. Even though the patterns are documented here in the context of the Debian project, they can also be generalized to other contexts.

In practical terms, the paper documents a set of patterns I have noticed in the last few years, when I have been pushing the Debian Continous Integration project. It should be an interesting read for people interested in the testing of Debian packages in their installed form, as done with autopkgtest. It should also be useful for people from other distributions interested in the subject, as the issues are not really Debian-specific.

I have recently finished the final version of the paper, which should be published in the ACM Digital Library at any point now. You can download a copy of the paper in PDF. Source is also available, if you are into markdown, LaTeX, makefiles and this sort of thing.

If everything goes according to plan, I should be presenting a talk on this at the next Debconf in Montreal.



Debian CI updates for September 2016

7 de Setembro de 2016, 22:07, por Antonio Terceiro

debci 1.4 was released just a few days ago. Among general improvements, I would like to highlight:

  • pretty much every place in the web UI that mentions a PASS or a FAIL also displays the tested package version. This was suggested to me on IRC by Holger
  • I also tried to workaround an instability when setting up the LXC containers used for the tests, where the test bed process setup would finish without failure even though some steps in the middle of it failed. This caused the very final step for the debci-specific setup to fail, so there was no debci user inside the container, which caused tests to fail because that user was missing. Before that was fixed I was always keeping an eye on this issue, fixing the issue by hand, and re-triggering the affected packages by hand, so as far I can tell there is no package whose status has been permanently affected by this.
  • Last, but not least, this release brings an interesting contribution by Gordon Ball, which is keeping track of different failure states. debci will now let you know whether a currently failing package has always failed, has passed in a previous version, or if the same version that is currently failing has previously passed.

ci.debian.net has been upgraded to debci 1.4 just after that. At the same time I have also upgraded autodep8 and autopkgtest to their latest versions, available in jessie-backports. This means that it is now safe for Debian packages to assume the changes in autopkgtest 4.0 are available, in special the $AUTOPKGTEST_* environment variables.

In other news, for several weeks there were had issues with tests not being scheduled when they should have. I was just assuming that the issue was due to the existing test scheduler, debci-batch, being broken. Today I was working on a new implementation that is going to be a lot faster, I started to hit a similar issue on my local tests, and finally realized what was wrong. The fact is that debci-batch stores the timestamp of the last time a package has been scheduled to run, and it there are no test result after that timestamp, it assumes the package is still in the queue to be tested, and does not schedule it again. It turns out that a few weeks ago, during maintainance work, I had cleared the queue, discarding all jobs that were there, but forgot to reset those timestamps, so when debci-batch came around again, it checked the timestamp of the last request and did not make new requests because there was no test result after that timestamp! I cleared all those timestamps, and the system should now go back to normal.

That is it for now. I you want to contribute to the Debian CI project and want to get in touch, you can pop up on the #debci channel on the OFTC IRC network, or mail the autopkgtest-devel mailing list.