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6 de Dezembro de 2009 , por Desconhecido -
Mageia é um fork do Mandriva Linux, apoiada por uma organização sem fins lucrativos reconhecida e colaboradores eleitos. Mais do que apenas oferecer um sistema operacional livre, seguro, estável e sustentável, o objetivo é a criação de uma administração estável e confiável para orientar projetos colaborativos.

Este blog é alimentado pela comunidade aqui na rede SoftwareLivre.org e pelo feed do Planet Mageia English.

Mageia Blog (English) : Waiting for Mageia 5: Spotlight on UEFI support

30 de Maio de 2015, por Planet Mageia (English) - 0sem comentários ainda

This article is addressed to users with some technical background. Summary for the non-techie: Mageia 5 supports UEFI, which means it’s now easier to install it on recent hardware. Bottom line: after the initial installation, which might be a little different (see below), UEFI really shouldn’t trouble you.

What’s UEFI?

UEFI has been around for a few years now, previously called EFI. It is a completely new and different firmware for booting 64 bit PC and replaced the old BIOS firmwares. It brings improvements over old BIOS, but it’s mainly known in the Linux community for rendering the installation of Linux systems more difficult on computers bought with a preinstalled system:

  1. because it necessitated development to support it;
  2. because of a security feature called Secure Boot, which refuses to boot any bootloader that is not signed with an official signing key;
  3. because it’s not always obvious how to boot to a DVD or an USB key (it depends on the firmware, whether Secure Boot is active, whether Fast Startup is active, etc.)

UEFI systems also use a new (to PCs) partitioning format called GPT, with a special EFI System Partition (ESP) which contains the bootloaders.

The references at the end offer fuller explanations.

Mageia and UEFI

With Mageia 4, in order to install to a system with UEFI you had two solutions:

  • activate legacy BIOS compatibility mode, aka Compatibility Support Module or CSM,
  • or follow manual instructions from our wiki, involving command line instructions to run as root during installation. Doable but not easy.

Mageia’s installers are now fully UEFI aware, so you can install easily along with other pre-existing systems.

What about Secure Boot?

First of all, Secure Boot is not UEFI. UEFI is the firmware, Secure Boot is one of the features among others. However, most pre-installed computers come with Secure Boot activated, which prevents users from booting any other system or installation medium. In order to install Mageia, you need to deactivate it in your firmware’s configuration. In order to manage to get to the configuration, see in your computer’s documentation how to proceed. There are lots of resources on the internet covering that subject. As of today, all manufacturers have an obligation to provide a way to disable secure boot.

Installing Mageia on an UEFI system

Both the Live and Classic images can be installed on UEFI hardware, but not the Dual arch ISO. Depending on your hardware or preference, just burn the 64 bit ISO image to DVD, or dump it to an USB flash drive. Existing Mageia users can use IsoDumper for this (install isodumper from the software center). For others, check this procedure. See also our dedicated wiki page. Then boot your computer from the prepared medium.

Booting the Classic installer on a UEFI system currently offers menu choices dependent on the boot medium: you need to choose the appropriate boot menu entry whether you’re installing from DVD or USB; this is not necessary for the Live installers. Once launched, there is no difference from non-UEFI for Live usage. Installation differs very slightly in needing to create or use an existing EFI System Partition (ESP) and mount it on /boot/EFI, and there is no choice of bootloader which is automatically Grub2 (grub2-efi). The preparation and deployment of Mageia installation media for UEFI systems is fully covered in our wiki.

Resources about UEFI:

If you are curious to know more, Adam Williamson wrote a good introduction to UEFI; there is also some information about it on our wiki page.

What about upgrade from Mageia 4?

It is not supported to upgrade an instance of Mageia 4 that had been installed in non-UEFI mode towards a Mageia 5 in UEFI mode.
Upgrading from an UEFI Mageia 4 to UEFI Mageia 5 is supported (as well as from non-UEFI Mageia 4 to non-UEFI Mageia 5 of course).

Mageia 5 is almost there, stay tuned!



Mageia Blog (English) : All things come to those who wait

26 de Abril de 2015, por Planet Mageia (English) - 0sem comentários ainda

And we’ve all waited long enough for Mageia 5 RC: go grab it!

While you wait for the download to complete, all restless and eager that you are to try this new release, let’s talk a bit about this release candidate: what can you expect of it, and why did it take so long?

UEFI support – for real

Mageia’s developers have been hard at work during this release cycle to add UEFI support to our installer, while the QA contributors were thoroughly testing everything that they could on their hardware. We are now proud to announce that you can install Mageia on UEFI systems fairly easily, using either our Live media or the classical installer (except from the DualDVD which does not support UEFI).

This is now the trial by fire for the main feature of Mageia 5: if you have a UEFI system, please try this release candidate in as many configurations as possible (dual boot with Windows or with other Linux distributions, etc.). And then please report any bug that you may encounter; we managed to get rid of most of the bugs noticed during this long pre-release testing, but our QA testers have relatively limited hardware resources.

Spring cleaning in the installer

Though it’s probably the most awaited feature, UEFI support is not the only improvement that was made in our installer, DrakX. The intensive testing done by the QA team over the last months brought a good deal of long-standing bugs to light, and a lot of work has been poured into fixing these issues: RAID support, GRUB 2 integration, graphical issues linked to GTK+ 3 evolutions, more logging and debugging features for urpmi and the installer… you name it!

For instance, we improved the default partitioning features to better reflect the needs of our users: the ready-made options to “erase and use the entire disk” or “use the free space” will now create a bigger root partition (up to 50 GB if you have a ton of free space, against 12 GB in previous releases). The “use free space on a Windows partition” option will also be less shy of using free space on NTFS partitions, letting you have a comfortable root partition if you want to install several desktop environments or some of the nice open source games shipped with Mageia 5.

Our most tested release so far

With over two months of development and testing, this release candidate is our most tested release so far, and we do hope that it will make Mageia 5 our most stable and mature release. The freeze period has been longer than anticipated, so you won’t find the most recent packages such as Kernel 4.0; on the other hand we are pretty confident that we have reached a good compromise between being cutting-edge and stable. Our packagers kept working on providing important bugfix releases and security fixes, while trying to make sure not to add any avoidable regression, and all in all Mageia 5 should satisfy both casual and power users.

An impressive team work between the devs and the QA testers

The testing period for this release candidate was like an endless game of table tennis, with developers on one side working hard on fixing release critical issues, and ISO testers on the other side, always running into new (and old) issues and making sure that the bug fixes were effective. A big thanks to all those involved in this tiring but rewarding testing period; we definitely set a new record with 9 rounds of RC ISOs tested over two months!

Special kudos to our QA team, and especially its newest members who joined during the Mageia 5 release cycle, for managing to keep testing update candidates for Mageia 4 while working on the RC ISOs.

Now it’s your turn

With so much development done between our 3rd beta and this release candidate, there is a lot to test and we need as much hardware covered as possible, especially to test UEFI support and other installer changes. So grab your copy, prepare your booting device and get started with Mageia 5 RC! Please have a look at the errata too, since there are already known issues that we couldn’t fix yet, and report any bug that affects you and that you can’t find in the errata or our Bugzilla.



Liberdade na Fronteira : Cantor in KDE Applications 15.04

26 de Abril de 2015, por Planet Mageia (English) - 0sem comentários ainda

KDE Applications 15.04 release brings a new version of the scientific programming software Cantor, with a lot of news. I am specially happy with this release because I worked in several parts of these new features. =)

Come with me™ and let’s see what is new in Cantor.

Cantor ported to Qt5/KF5

cantor-kf5

Cantor Qt5/KF5 + Breeze theme. In the image it is possible to see the terminal/worksheet, variable management panel, syntax highlighting, code completion, and the standard interface

I started the Cantor port to Qt5/KF5 during previous LaKademy and I continued the development along the year. Maybe I had pushed code from 5 different countries since the beginning of this work.

The change for this new technology was successfully completed, and for the moment we don’t notice any feature missed or new critical bug. All the backends and plugins were ported, and some new bugs created during this work were fixed.

We would like to ask for Cantor users to report any problem or bug in bugzilla. Anyway, the software is really very stable.

When you run Cantor Qt5/KF5 version on the first time, the software will look for Cantor Qt4 configurations and, if it exists, the configurations will be automagically migrated to Cantor Qt5/KF5.

Backend for Python 3

In Season of KDE 2014 I was the mentor of Minh Ngo in the project to create a backend for Python 3, increasing the number of backends in Cantor to 10!

cantor-backends

Backend selection screen: Python 3 and their 9 brothers

The backend developed by Minh uses D-Bus protocol to allow communication between Cantor and Python 3. This architecture is different of Python 2, but it is present in others backends, as in the backend for R.

The cool thing is Cantor can be interesting for pythonistas using Python 2 and/or Python 3 now. We would like to get feedback from you, guys!

Icon!

Cantor first release was originally in 2009, with KDE SC 4.4. Since that date the software did not have an icon.

The Cantor Qt5/KF5 release marks a substantial change in the development of the application, then it is also a good time to release an icon to the software.

Ícone do Cantor

Cantor icon

The art is excellent! It presents the idea of Cantor: a blackboard to you write and develop your equations and formulas while scratches his head and think “and now, what I need to do to solve it?”. =)

Thank you Andreas Kainz and Uri Herrera, members of VDG team and authors of Cantor icon!

Other changes and bug fixes

Most bugs added in the Qt5/KF5 port were fixed before the release.

There are some small changes to be cited: in KNewStuff categories world, “Python2″ category was changed to “Python 2″ and “Python 3″ category was added; the automatic loading of pylab module in Python backends was dropped; now it is possible to run Python commands mixed with comments in the worksheet; and more.

You can see a complete log of commits, bugfixes, and new features added in this release in this page.

Future works

As future work maybe the high-priority for this moment is to drop KDELibs4Support from Cantor. Lucas developed part of this work and we would like to finish it for the next release.

I intend to test if D-Bus communication can be a good solution for Scilab backend. Another task is to redesign the graphical generation assistants of Python backends. A long-term work is to follow the creation of Jupyter project, the future of IPython notebooks. If Cantor can to be compatible with Jupyter, it will be really nice for users and to encourage the collaboration between different communities interested in scientific programming and open science.

I will take advantage of the Cantor Qt5/KF5 release to write about how to use Cantor in two different ways: the Matlab way and the IPython notebooks way. Keep your eyes in the updates from this blog! =)

If you would like to help in Cantor development, please contact me or mail kde-edu maillist and let’s talk about bug fixes, development of new features, and more.

Donations to KDE Brasil – LaKademy 2015!

If you would like to support my work, please make a donation to KDE Brasil. We will host the KDE Latin-American Summit – LaKademy and we need some money to put some latin-american contributors to work together face-to-face. I will focus my LaKademy work in the previously mentioned future works.

You can read more about LaKademy in this dot.KDE history. This page in English explain how to donate. There is other page with the same content in Spanish.



Philippe Makowski : Mageia 5 Cinnamon with Fedora chroot

18 de Março de 2015, por Desconhecido - 0sem comentários ainda

I moved my main home computer to Mageia 5 (it was under Fedora before).

I choose Cinnamon because I have it on my laptop and I like it.

Since I have to maintain my Fedora packages (Firebird related), I choosed to create a Fedora 21 chroot.

Here what I did under Mageia 5 :

# urpmi yum python-lzma
# mkdir -p /var/local/chroot/fedora/var/lib/rpm
# rpm --root /var/local/chroot/fedora --initdb
# cd /tmp/
# wget ftp://195.220.108.108/linux/fedora/linux/releases/21/Everything/x86_64/os/Packages/f/fedora-release-21-2.noarch.rpm
# wget ftp://195.220.108.108/linux/fedora/linux/releases/21/Everything/x86_64/os/Packages/f/fedora-repos-21-2.noarch.rpm
# rpm -ivh --nodeps --root /var/local/chroot/fedora fedora*rpm
# for f in /var/local/chroot/fedora/etc/yum.repos.d/*; do  sed -i 's/$basearch/x86_64/g;' $f; done
# ln -s /var/local/chroot/fedora/etc/pki/rpm-gpg/ /etc/pki/rpm-gpg
# yum --installroot=/var/local/chroot/fedora repolist all
# yum --installroot=/var/local/chroot/fedora groupinstall Core
# urpmi schroot
Configure the chroot in schroot :
$ cat /etc/schroot/chroot.d/fedora
[fedora]
description=Fedora 21
type=directory
directory=/var/local/chroot/fedora
users=philippe
groups=wheel
root-groups=root,wheel
aliases=default
preserve-environment=true
Finally, we do some customizations to make the Fedora system schroot friendly
# echo fedora21 > /var/local/chroot/fedora/etc/debian_chroot
# cat << 'EOF' > /var/local/chroot/fedora/etc/profile.d/debian_chroot.sh
# set variable identifying the chroot you work in (used in the prompt below)
if [ -z "${debian_chroot:-}" ] && [ -r /etc/debian_chroot ]; then
debian_chroot=$(cat /etc/debian_chroot)
fi
# set a fancy prompt (non-color, overwrite the one in /etc/profile)
PS1='${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h:\w\$ '
EOF
Test :
philippe@callandor ~$ schroot -c fedora
(fedora)philippe@callandor:~$ cat /etc/fedora-release
Fedora release 21 (Twenty One)
All is ok, I can now set up the Fedora packager tools with a yum install fedora-packager and fedora-packager-setup

Mageia Blog (English) : Mageia at the Chemnitz Linux Days 2015

15 de Março de 2015, por Desconhecido - 0sem comentários ainda

CLT2015On Saturday 21st and Sonday 22nd of March, Mageia will be present at the Chemnitz Linux Days 2015 (Chemnitzer Linux-Tage, CLT 2015).

As longstanding exhibitors we are glad to participate once again to one of the biggest free software community meeting in Germany after one year of absence. There you will have the possibility to get a preview of our upcoming Mageia 5 release and discuss all aspects of the Mageia project.

The wide program contains a lot of different talks, workshops for young and old and a lot of other interesting projects will present their work. You will find the complete program here.

We are looking forward to see you at the CLT 2015!



Tags deste artigo: mageia